New Website Feature, the Event Calendar

The New York State Board has added an event calendar to the New YorK State Website. You can find it at www.nyaoh.com/events.

We will be putting on the calendar various State, County and Division sponsored events throughout the year and your and your division can submit events to be posted on this calendar.

Now, we are only going to post events that benefit the Hibernian Division, for example, the Irish 2000 Festival in Saratoga, the Hudson Valley Irish Fest, and the Nassau County Feis are run by corporations, but the members that  run these events are Hibernians and the events benefit the underlying Counties and Divisions, so they will be posted.

An example of what not to submit is a local Knights of Columbus dinner, where maybe 10 members of the Divisions are also members of that Council. Since no benefit goes to the AOH, please do not submit it since it will not be posted. Also please do not submit division meetings. They are already listed on the division directory, so there is no need to list them twice.

When posting events, please send in a word document that can be copied and pasted or type directly into the email information about the event. Do not send a PDF as many times they can’t be copied and pasted. PDFs will not be accepted. The address of the event, including the zip code and phone number of the location. Include the Date, the Time, and the Sponsoring Division. Also include the Contact Person’s Name, Phone Number and Email Address.

And please send it to calendar@nyaoh.com or nyaohcalendar@gmail.com to submit it. You can contact me at 516-515-0484 for any questions.

International Great Hunger Commemoration

In recognition of the considerable significance of The Great Hunger, the Irish Government established a National Famine Commemoration Committee, chaired by TD Eamon Ó Cuív, Minister for Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs in 2008. The first National Memorial Day was held on 25 May, 2008 in Dublin. It was so well received that the following year it was extended to an International Commemoration and it was established that the National Memorial Day in Ireland would revolve between the four provinces.

On May 17, 2009, the Irish National commemoration took place in Skibbereen, Co. Cork with parallel events held in Canada, Australia and other Irish communities around the world. International participants were encouraged to hold their own local events to commemorate the Great Hunger while, in Ireland, all public and sporting events observed a minute’s silence on that day. The AOH National and NY State Boards produced a onehour, four-part DVD on the tragedy, especially for teachers, entitled The Reasons For Learning as the AOH part in the international commemoration.

In 2010, the Irish National commemoration site was in Murrisk, Co. Mayo on 16 May and even more members of the Irish Diaspora around the world celebrated masses and/or sponsored events on that date as world-wide interest grew. Masses International Great Hunger Commemoration were also celebrated and services held at Great Hunger Memorials across America. The DVD Reasons for Learning was put on the AOH.Com national website for free download with a number of lesson plans and exercises in support of the DVD. A number of divisions held public showings of the DVD on that weekend.

This year, 2011, the international commemoration is scheduled for May 21 and 22. Our National President has urged local AOH divisions to schedule some type of public activity in their local areas and to alert the media to the event. For those without access to the Internet, and who would like a copy of the DVD on the Great Hunger, it is still available at only $18. from the AOH Charities by contacting F. Kearney at (203) 980-9324.

There is nothing else in the history of the Irish people that can be likened to the Great Starvation of 1845 and beyond, either for its immediate impact on Ireland, its legacy of emigration, its effect on the United States, its cultural loss or the decline of the Irish language. The population of Ireland, which exceeded 8 million in the Census of 1841, was reduced by millions through death and emigration. In honor of those who died, those who refused to abandon their faith and those who fled Ireland in order to survive, articles can be submitted to local media and educational workshops can be held to inform people about the official apathy that caused a potato blight to become a man-made tragedy. Historians have proclaimed Ireland’s Great Hunger as the worst social disaster of the 19th century when people starved outside the gates of prosperous farms as tons of food was exported. Let’s remember the victims on May 21-22.

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