Glen Cove St. Patrick’s Day Parade

The 25rd Annual Glen Cove St Patrick’s Day Parade will take place on Sunday, March 17, 2013 at 1 p.m at the Finley Middle School.

Traditional Irish Pipers perform in the Glen Cove St. Patrick’s Day Parade

The Parade has taken place annually since 1989.  It has grown to be the largest annual parade in Glen Cove and a civic celebration that is eagerly awaited each spring by all residents of the North Shore and the entire Irish community of Long Island.

2013 Grand Marshal Daniel Lane. Aides AOH and LAOH members Lisa Forgione, Joe McDonald, Robert and Pamela Panzenbeck.

Hurricane Sandy Housing Information

For displaced friends and families of the AOH from Hurricane Sandy, we will be listing available housing on this site. If you have housing available, please contact Joe McDonald at 516-522-0711 or by email at jmcdonald@nyaoh.com

Available apartments

Baldwin, NY
21 Edna Count – 1,2 and 3 Bedrooms available
516-797-8142

Farmingdale, NY
Single Family Home
Contact Brendan Mahoney at 516-124-1945
Owner listed more information on Craigs List

Copiague, NY
3 Bedroom Apartment
Contact Pat Kearney 631-278-1904

Schnectady, NY
1000 SF Apartment
Contact Michael Glen @ mglen2@nycap.rr.com

President’s Message

I start by thanking all of the Delegates for their support at our AOH/NYS Convention. I look forward to traveling our great state and meeting with as many of you as I can.

I would like to thank Charles “Chip” McLean for his leadership the past two years.

I congratulate the new Ladies State President, my cousin, Denise Sobus. I look forward to working with her and her Board the next two years.

I would also like to congratulate all the newly elected and appointed Officers of both the LAOH and AOH New York State Boards.

I must also thank Pearl River for hosting an outstanding Convention.

There is much work ahead for the new Board. We will have a wrap up meeting in Pearl River as soon as all the reports are completed.

We will also be going to Saratoga to go over the contract for the 2013 AOH/NYS Convention on November 5, 2011.

I am pleased to announce that Steve Curran will be the 2013 AOH/NYS Convention Chairman. The local Chairman will be Chris Burgman.

The new AOH/NYS Web Site is up and running. I thank Web Master Joe McDonald for all the time he dedicated to completing this endeavor.

Our next AOH/NYS Board Meeting will be held in Schenectady, NY on Saturday October 22, 2011. The day will start at 9:00am with a Pro-Life Mass. The Board Meeting will start at 10:30am SHARP.  At 2:00pm the AOH/NYS Mixed Doubles Bowling will be held followed by a dinner at the Schenectady Hall. I hope you are able to participate in all three events.

New York News

The Easter Rising Remembered on Long Island

By Joe McDonald

 

On April 25th, more than 150 people attended the annual Easter Rising memorial service in Mineola, NY. At a location behind the courthouse, stands the now completed Irish memorial, a testament to those who gave their lives for Ireland’s freedom in the early 20th Century. Sponsored by the Irish Monument Committee each Easter Monday, the one hour ceremony allows all those present to remember the martyrs of 1916.

The committee is comprised of various Irish organizations including the Nassau County Board of the Ancient order of Hibernians, the Nassau Police Emerald Society, the Irish American Society of Nassau, Suffolk and Queens, the Irish Culture Society of Garden City, Irish Northern Aid, The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, and the Irish Americans in Government.

“It’s important to have this ceremony”, said Nassau County AOH Freedom For All Ireland Chairman Vic Sackett, “because after 800 years of oppression by the British, Irish leaders who knew very well what freedom was, had the courage to plan and train an uprising to would have some chance of success.  Although the rising was not successful, within two years, it rallied the Irish population to elect their own representatives and government, which then declared the 32 County Republic in 1919.”

This year’s ceremony, which was headed by the Police Emerald Society, included remarks from Consul General of Ireland Noel Kilkenny, and Leitrim County Councilor Martin Kenny. Kilkenny spoke about those who died in the Easter Rising and why it is important for people to believe in freedom and independence, while Kenny remarked about the culture of Ireland and how it is not a Catholic Protestant rivalry, but the mentality of peasants vs. planters.  “And the Irish people rose above the peasant mentality to become something more,” he remarked. “Now the planters need to change their way of thinking, for Ireland to become the great county it can be.”

The monument has been located behind the Nassau County Court House since 1979, albeit unfinished. Recently, Irish groups throughout Long island decided to complete and renovate the project. Two years ago the top was put on the monument, a harp with 32 strings representing the 32 counties and the names of 15 who died on the base. Last year, flowers, lights and a walkway were added and to finish it off benches will be installed and the plaques will be placed back onto the memorial.

The memorial concluded with a laying of a wreath at the monument.  “It’s rather unique that the Easter Rising is remembered on public ground in the United States,” said AOH Brother Robert Lynch. “I can’t think of any other place in America that has something dedicated to such an important event.”

Color Guard at the Easter Rising Memorial. Photo by Jim Henry

Div. 11 Hicksville marches proudly in the NYC Parade

The Mohawk Valley Irish Cultural Center will be built in Utica, NY

by John E. Fox

 

The Mohawk Valley Irish Cultural Center will be built in West Utica following discussions with city leaders, Great American Irish Festival Inc. organizers said. An Irish cultural center not only would be a benefit to West Utica’s Brewery District, but it bodes well for the entire city, Mayor David Roefaro said.  “It’s a win-win for everybody,” Roefaro said. “That piece of property is passionate to the Irish,” he said of the parking lot at Cooper and Columbia streets, where the former St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church was founded in the 1850s. The $2 million project — funded almost exclusively from proceeds of the Great American Irish Festival — will yield a two-story building with an authentic Irish pub, kitchen, meeting rooms and office space. Matthew Sullivan, director of the festival, will serve as executive director of the center. A variety of Irish organizations, including the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, will make use of the space, Sullivan said. Construction of the 2-story multi-purpose, 10,000 square foot facility will include, a full basement, a banquet hall that will be able to accommodate about 300 people, a full commercial kitchen, an authentic Irish Pub, a cultural room, a meeting room as well as office spaces. Construction of the building will begin, “as soon as the weather will allow,” Sullivan said, adding that “We wanted this to be an investment in the hub of downtown and we wanted to be part of Varick Street, with the brewery,” A groundbreaking ceremony emceed by Utica Fire Chief Russell Brooks and attended by about 150 people was held at 623 Columbia St. was held Thursday, St. Patrick’s Day.  Brooks commended Sullivan for his efforts and joked about the fallacy of the phrase, “the luck of the Irish.”  “The Irish got where we are by hard work and fighting for what we believe in,” he said. The center site was once home to the first Irish Catholic parish in the city, St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church, which was founded in the 1850s but disbanded and later demolished in the 1960s. “This site is sacred ground for the Irish community,” Sullivan said. The plan has been through the city zoning and planning boards and has gained all necessary approvals Sullivan said. The entity that will run the center will be a non-profit, registered with the State Education Department as a Historical Society with Collections. The Irish pub will be open to the public and should be part of the Varick Street bar scene. Sullivan first began working on the project in 2003 through his involvement with the AOH, Brooks told the gathered crowd. Though some of the money came from other sources, both Sullivan and Brooks said no government money is involved. The ceremony also included several prayers from local priests, bagpipe tunes, the Irish and American national anthems and Irish ballads. Shortly after a procession down Varick Street, a robust party was held at the Celtic Harp.

The Honorable Michael Dwyer named Grand Marshal

by John E. Fox

Judge Michael Dwyer

Oneida County Court Judge Michael Dwyer was named as the grand marshal for Utica’s (NY) 2011 St. Patrick’s Day Parade, said Kevin Dowling, the parade director. Dwyer is a “standup” person who is very deserving of being named grand marshal and has a difficult job as county court judge, “He works very hard for this community,” Dowling said. Dwyer said there are many others who deserve the honor just as much or more than he does. “I am very proud, and also very humbled,” Dwyer said. 141 groups turned out for the annual parade down Genesee Street this year, according to event director Kevin Dowling. Other participants included seven bagpipe bands, nine or ten additional musical groups and a plethora of service organizations – all of which made their way from Oneida Square to Columbia Street.

“This is the third largest parade in the state behind New York City and Buffalo,” Dowling said. “Last year, we counted about 2,000 people marching in the parade. With 33 more units that entered this year, I wouldn’t be surprised if we got up to 2,500.” Many say for them the parade is a way to honor their ancestors by remembering Irish traditions and traditional music.

“I see the pride in being Irish; just being Irish you know, having it in your blood, but it represents the day and the spirit and the holiday,” said parade attendee Michael Collins.

Parade goers say the event wasn’t just about celebrating their heritage, but also about recognizing some important members of the community. It was a chance for local organizations — from emergency squads to food banks — to shine. Dowling, and other parade organizers, said the parade remains a community-oriented event, where rowdier celebrators mix with families and children – and where everyone has a good time. “The key theme that we try to stress is respect,” Dowling said. “Everyone is respectful of each other and we have a good time.”

New York News

The Easter Rising Remembered on Long Island

By Joe McDonald

 

On April 25th, more than 150 people attended the annual Easter Rising memorial service in Mineola, NY. At a location behind the courthouse, stands the now completed Irish memorial, a testament to those who gave their lives for Ireland’s freedom in the early 20th Century. Sponsored by the Irish Monument Committee each Easter Monday, the one hour ceremony allows all those present to remember the martyrs of 1916.

The committee is comprised of various Irish organizations including the Nassau County Board of the Ancient order of Hibernians, the Nassau Police Emerald Society, the Irish American Society of Nassau, Suffolk and Queens, the Irish Culture Society of Garden City, Irish Northern Aid, The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, and the Irish Americans in Government.

“It’s important to have this ceremony”, said Nassau County AOH Freedom For All Ireland Chairman Vic Sackett, “because after 800 years of oppression by the British, Irish leaders who knew very well what freedom was, had the courage to plan and train an uprising to would have some chance of success.  Although the rising was not successful, within two years, it rallied the Irish population to elect their own representatives and government, which then declared the 32 County Republic in 1919.”

This year’s ceremony, which was headed by the Police Emerald Society, included remarks from Consul General of Ireland Noel Kilkenny, and Leitrim County Councilor Martin Kenny. Kilkenny spoke about those who died in the Easter Rising and why it is important for people to believe in freedom and independence, while Kenny remarked about the culture of Ireland and how it is not a Catholic Protestant rivalry, but the mentality of peasants vs. planters.  “And the Irish people rose above the peasant mentality to become something more,” he remarked. “Now the planters need to change their way of thinking, for Ireland to become the great county it can be.”

The monument has been located behind the Nassau County Court House since 1979, albeit unfinished. Recently, Irish groups throughout Long island decided to complete and renovate the project. Two years ago the top was put on the monument, a harp with 32 strings representing the 32 counties and the names of 15 who died on the base. Last year, flowers, lights and a walkway were added and to finish it off benches will be installed and the plaques will be placed back onto the memorial.

The memorial concluded with a laying of a wreath at the monument.  “It’s rather unique that the Easter Rising is remembered on public ground in the United States,” said AOH Brother Robert Lynch. “I can’t think of any other place in America that has something dedicated to such an important event.”

Color Guard at the Easter Rising Memorial. Photo by Jim Henry

Div. 11 Hicksville marches proudly in the NYC Parade

The Mohawk Valley Irish Cultural Center will be built in Utica, NY

by John E. Fox

 

The Mohawk Valley Irish Cultural Center will be built in West Utica following discussions with city leaders, Great American Irish Festival Inc. organizers said. An Irish cultural center not only would be a benefit to West Utica’s Brewery District, but it bodes well for the entire city, Mayor David Roefaro said.  “It’s a win-win for everybody,” Roefaro said. “That piece of property is passionate to the Irish,” he said of the parking lot at Cooper and Columbia streets, where the former St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church was founded in the 1850s. The $2 million project — funded almost exclusively from proceeds of the Great American Irish Festival — will yield a two-story building with an authentic Irish pub, kitchen, meeting rooms and office space. Matthew Sullivan, director of the festival, will serve as executive director of the center. A variety of Irish organizations, including the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, will make use of the space, Sullivan said. Construction of the 2-story multi-purpose, 10,000 square foot facility will include, a full basement, a banquet hall that will be able to accommodate about 300 people, a full commercial kitchen, an authentic Irish Pub, a cultural room, a meeting room as well as office spaces. Construction of the building will begin, “as soon as the weather will allow,” Sullivan said, adding that “We wanted this to be an investment in the hub of downtown and we wanted to be part of Varick Street, with the brewery,” A groundbreaking ceremony emceed by Utica Fire Chief Russell Brooks and attended by about 150 people was held at 623 Columbia St. was held Thursday, St. Patrick’s Day.  Brooks commended Sullivan for his efforts and joked about the fallacy of the phrase, “the luck of the Irish.”  “The Irish got where we are by hard work and fighting for what we believe in,” he said. The center site was once home to the first Irish Catholic parish in the city, St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic Church, which was founded in the 1850s but disbanded and later demolished in the 1960s. “This site is sacred ground for the Irish community,” Sullivan said. The plan has been through the city zoning and planning boards and has gained all necessary approvals Sullivan said. The entity that will run the center will be a non-profit, registered with the State Education Department as a Historical Society with Collections. The Irish pub will be open to the public and should be part of the Varick Street bar scene. Sullivan first began working on the project in 2003 through his involvement with the AOH, Brooks told the gathered crowd. Though some of the money came from other sources, both Sullivan and Brooks said no government money is involved. The ceremony also included several prayers from local priests, bagpipe tunes, the Irish and American national anthems and Irish ballads. Shortly after a procession down Varick Street, a robust party was held at the Celtic Harp.

The Honorable Michael Dwyer named Grand Marshal

by John E. Fox

Judge Michael Dwyer

Oneida County Court Judge Michael Dwyer was named as the grand marshal for Utica’s (NY) 2011 St. Patrick’s Day Parade, said Kevin Dowling, the parade director. Dwyer is a “standup” person who is very deserving of being named grand marshal and has a difficult job as county court judge, “He works very hard for this community,” Dowling said. Dwyer said there are many others who deserve the honor just as much or more than he does. “I am very proud, and also very humbled,” Dwyer said. 141 groups turned out for the annual parade down Genesee Street this year, according to event director Kevin Dowling. Other participants included seven bagpipe bands, nine or ten additional musical groups and a plethora of service organizations – all of which made their way from Oneida Square to Columbia Street.

“This is the third largest parade in the state behind New York City and Buffalo,” Dowling said. “Last year, we counted about 2,000 people marching in the parade. With 33 more units that entered this year, I wouldn’t be surprised if we got up to 2,500.” Many say for them the parade is a way to honor their ancestors by remembering Irish traditions and traditional music.

“I see the pride in being Irish; just being Irish you know, having it in your blood, but it represents the day and the spirit and the holiday,” said parade attendee Michael Collins.

Parade goers say the event wasn’t just about celebrating their heritage, but also about recognizing some important members of the community. It was a chance for local organizations — from emergency squads to food banks — to shine. Dowling, and other parade organizers, said the parade remains a community-oriented event, where rowdier celebrators mix with families and children – and where everyone has a good time. “The key theme that we try to stress is respect,” Dowling said. “Everyone is respectful of each other and we have a good time.”

Share

New York News

On Feb. 27th, the Glen Cove Div 8 presented sashes to its Grand Marshal and Aides for the Parade that was held on March 20th. Pictured (L – R) Division 8 LAOH President Lisa Forgione, Aide to the Grand Marshal Jim Burke, Aide to the Grand Marshal Carol McTigue, Grand Marshal Andy Stafford, Div 8 President Joe McDonald

AOH Div 14 donation to the Mary Brennan Soup Kitchen

 

Tim Myles (L) and Jim Henry (R) present a donation to Stephan Robinson (Center) at the "Mary Brennan Soup Kitchen" in Hempstead, NY.

Our Lady of Knock Division held 46th Annual St. Patrick’s Parade Grand Marshal’s Ball.

On Saturday February 26, 2011, AOH Our Lady of Knock Div 7, Suffolk County, NY held its 46th Annual St. Patrick’s Parade Grand Marshal’s Ball. Div 7 honored long time member and community leader Kevin Boyle, Sr. Kevin is a United States Navy Veteran, Past Hibernian of the Year, and volunteer for all Hibernian activities. In addition to many family members and friends, the Ball was attended by National, State, County and Division officers from both the AOH and the LAOH. They all acknowledged Kevin’s commitment to our motto of Friendship, Unity and Christian Charity. By honoring Kevin, we honor ourselves.

Pictured (L – R) Kneeling – Ch. of Comm. Tom McHugh, Mar. Shawn O'Neill, Sent. John Owen, Sec. Dr. Dave Ring. Standing – Fin. Sec. Larry Wolff, VP Mac McFadden, Suffolk Pres. Brian Clancy, NYS Past Pres. John Hennessy, Nat. VP Brendan Moore, Aide Kevin Boyle Jr., Grand Marshal Kevin Boyle, Aide Herman Boyle, Treas. Tom Davis, NYS VP Mike McNabb, NYS Sec. Jim Burke, Pres. Vic Vogel. (Photo courtesy of Maureen Meier)


Bronx Hibernians Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day Parade Installation

Bronx Hibernians gather at the Installation dinner at Antun’s Restaurant to congratulate John J. Casserly on his selection as an aide to the grand marshal for the New York City St Patrick’s Day parade on March 17th.

Pictured (L – R) Christopher Butler, John J. Hyland, Bronx Aide – John J. Casserly, Parade Chairman – John T. Dunleavy, Bronx County President – Martin Keller, Robert F. Nolan and John Quinn.

Share

Leadership Seminar

Pictured (L-R) Tom Beirne, Dan Dennehy, Matt Nelligan, Brian Kelly, Aidan O'Kelly-Lynch

An AOH Leadership Seminar was held Saturday, November 13 at the new Hibernian Hall at the Hudson Valley Irish Center in Verplanck, NY.  A panel including Matt Nelligan, 2012 National Convention Chairman and Past NYS President, Tom Beirne, NY County President, Brian Kelly, Westchester County, and Dan Dennehy, National Immigration Chairman. Over fifty Hibernians from New Jersey, Connecticut and Ohio, as well as members from across NY State joined the members from the Metropolitan area in participating in this remarkable forum. Brendan Moore, National Vice President, along with National Directors Jere Cole & Danny O’Connell, Sean Pender, National FFAI, Joe McDonald, Digital Hibernian Digest and Ed Rice, NY State Organizer provided their observations and expertise to the forum. New acquaintances were made and information shared to benefit the good of the Order.

Brendan Moore congratulated Brothers Dan Dennehy, Matt Nelligan, Tom Beirne, and Brian Kelly for their efforts in structuring and presenting this seminar. “They achieved and surpassed all of their objectives. Their Leadership Seminar should be further developed and repeated throughout the AOH.”

The seminar focused on the following topics:

  • AOH Officer & Member
  • Roles, responsibilities & duties
  • AOH Halls
  • Meetings and Ceremonies
  • Layout and Decorum
  • Our Constitution & Bylaws
  • Robert’s Rules of Order:
  • For the Good of Our Order
  • Recruitment & Retention
  • Brothers for Life

Matt Nelligan thanked Brother Dennehy for putting the seminar together stating, “In order to make sure that our Order continues to grow and thrive we need to constantly prepare our members for leadership roles. This Seminar provided a format for Local, State and National Officers in our organization to educate our future leaders on the rules, regulations and protocols that they need to be familiar with.”

“The goal of the seminar was to familiarize newer Hibernians with our leadership and organization, to provide a better understanding of our Order and to encourage recruitment and retention by sharing successful efforts and methods.” stated Dan Dennehy.  He added “I believe that the seminar achieved greater than anticipated success, highlighted aspects of our Order that further focused on and that the social aspect of the day definitely benefited all those in attendance.”

Food and refreshment were provided by President Aidan O’Kelly Lynch, Div 18 and the officers and members of the host Division – Westchester County Division 18, Peekskill. Visiting Hibernians admired the hall, which boasted relics from the Division including a poster from an 1898 boat ride sponsored by the local AOH. Those early Hibernians, many of whom were Irish immigrants, built the building and inscribed their names in the bricks outside on July 4, 1876.

Share

The Digest Goes Digital

Online Editor Joe McDonald

After months of preparation, the Hibernian Digest has entered the digital age.  The new Digital Digest will be linked through our national website www.AOH.com and will include an ever expanding archive of articles from past print editions.  In addition to the print articles, the site has been designed to offer expanded space for more content not currently able to make it into the printed edition mailed to all members.  The Digital Digest will also include a large expansion of pictures associated with articles submitted by members.  Keith Carney, editor of the Digest commented, We have numerous pictures submitted by members that only make it to the cutting room floor because of limited space.  But pictures tell great stories of the life and times of our Order and it the Digital edition now provides us with the perfect mechanism to bring them to the membership through the Internet.

Carney named New York brother Joe McDonald as the new online editor.  Joe joined the AOH back in 2007 and has vast experience in website creation and management.  He is currently the Vice President of the Mike Moran Division 8 in Glen Cove, NY and the Webmaster of Nassau County. Joe also serves on the Nassau County Hibernian Feis committee, designing and running the festival’s website.  Joe, 40, comes to the Hibernian Digest with seven years of experience in the sports media. He currently serves as Assistant Editor of Mets Inside Pitch Magazine, Assistant Online Editor of Baseball Digest, and publishes his own sports website NYSportsDay.com, covering the New York Mets, New York Rangers, and the US Tennis Open himself. He is a member of the Professional Hockey Writers Association and also the United States Tennis Writers Association.  In 2006, Joe opened up his own web design firm Damocles Designs, where he specializes in site design and search engine optimization. With all the changes to the media over the past seven years, I am very happy to help bring the Hibernian Digest online, McDonald said. I hope this website will help spread the motto of ‘Friendship, Unity, and Christian Charity’ to a greater audience. Joe currently lives in West Hempstead, NY with his wife Liz and 20 month-old daughter Jamie Ann. He also has a six year-old son Joseph Patrick.

The digital Digest will include electronic advertising controlled by the national board and it is hoped that it will be able to begin generating revenue in the next few months once the site gains some popularity.  The site will also include a comprehensive archive of previously printed Digests in the popular Adobe Acrobat .pdf format.

Share